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Holed shoes and smoked salmon

Sticky

I grew up in a Scotland wholly ruled from Westminster. Both my parents worked but sometimes we went to school with cardboard in our holed shoes. We had enough to eat because my mother worked in the director’s canteen of a shipyard –  smoked salmon and roast meat leftovers. We went to Glasgow at term time with a Provident cheque to buy our school uniforms and spent the rest of the year paying it off There were children in my class dressed entirely in army surplus with the sleeves and trousers rolled up. I now understand why many of the children were so much smaller than their classmates.

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Independence our right

Sticky

The union is broken.

This is my personal view on the “State of Scotland” based on personal experience and the tiny amount of  Scottish history taught in Scottish schools in the early 50s.

Scotland is not a defeated country ruled by England, we are equals in a union formed in the 1706.

Westminster fails to understand that the Acts of Union was a pact between two states, based on consent. The Union can not continue without the consent of both parties. Ignoring the will of the people of Scotland and denying our right to dissolve this union is akin to Brussels telling the UK they can not leave the EU. Taking Scotland out of the EU when the majority of Scots voted remain is akin to Germany deciding to leave the EU and telling the Netherlands they must leave as well.

The Union no longer works for Scotland (Westminster does not even work for  the North of England).

A true union is states, countries or organisations working together for the joint good not one member forcing its will on another member. We have a chance to go forward as independent allied nations but only if we can separate in an honest and civilised manner. A messy divoce could cause untold harm and take generations to forget.

A common argument from my many English friends is that the Scots are poor cousins who could not survive financially on their own. Do yourself a favour England, please chuck us out, by your own argument you will be much better off.

When I was in my twenties I let a homeless  friend share my home, although he was working he never paid a penny for the entire time he was there. When he told me he was leaving I didn’t say don’t go, you can’t afford it. I leant him a suitcase.  We are still friends although I never got the suitcase back. 

I promise England we shall return your suitcase and remain friends.